One Chicago Entrepreneur Has Not Forgotten About Nepal’s Earthquake Victims

According to a new paper published by Nature Geoscience, the massive earthquake that torn Nepal apart in April of 2015 could happen again and soon. According to scientists that have been studying the Himalayan Thrust fault, the fault was ruptured but not all the way to the surface. The rupture stopped 11 kilometers under Kathmandu Valley, and that means as the Indian tectonic plate gradually slips under the Eurasian plate another earthquake the size of the April earthquake could happen again.
The people that were impacted by the earthquake and the subsequent quake that follow a few weeks later have been receiving aid all year from countries all over the world. But the devastation was so massive that more funds are needed to repair the infrastructure and the homes that were destroyed by both earthquakes. One Chicago man has been sending money to friends in Nepal for the last eight months, but he decided that was not enough. Majeed Ekbal, the Chicago entrepreneur, opened a GoFundMe account recently to raise more money for the victims of the quakes.
Ekbal is a successful businessman, and has his fingers in several business ventures in the “Windy City.” After graduating from American University, Ekbal came to Chicago and began investing in the real estate market. His latest venture, Expresso Inc. is a grocery delivery service on the Near North Side of the city. Expresso Inc. works with the major grocery chains as well as specialty shops, and the company has been well received.

Majeed Ekbal has stayed in contact with his friends in Nepal, and he decided he had to do more after listening to the dire conditions that still exist in certain earthquake areas. The money raised from the GoFundMe campaign will go to a CrowdRise fund that has a goal of $1 million for medical and disaster relief.
If a new earthquake strikes Nepal as predicted by the scientists studying the Himalayan Thrust fault, Nepal will need more aid and money. The scientists say earthquakes don’t usually reoccur quickly, but because the fault is held up by smaller faults it could rupture at any time.